Category Archives: herd behavior

The ‘Bread And Circuses’ Tactic Is Still Advancing Political Power After 2,000 Years Of Use Against The People

“… Already long ago, from when we sold our vote to no man, the People have abdicated our duties; for the People who once upon a time handed out military command, high civil office, legions — everything, now restrains itself and anxiously hopes for just two things: bread and circuses…”  – Juvenal, Ancient Rome

“What could I do at Rome? I don’t know how to cheat…”  – Juvenal

Via: Wikipedia

Bread and circuses” (or bread and games) (from Latinpanem et circenses) is a metaphor for a superficial means of appeasement. In the case of politics, the phrase is used to describe the creation of public approval, not through exemplary or excellent public service or public policy, but through diversion; distraction; or the mere satisfaction of the immediate, shallow requirements of a populace, as an offered “palliative.” Juvenal decried it as a simplistic motivation of common people. The phrase also implies the erosion or ignorance of civic duty amongst the concerns of the common man.

In modern usage, the phrase is taken to describe a populace that no longer values civic virtues and the public life. To many, it connotes a supposed triviality and frivolity that characterized the Roman Republic prior to its decline into the autocratic monarchy characteristic of the later Roman Empire‘s transformation about 44 B.C.

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The Hunger Games’ Names Explained

The Hunger Games and Ancient Rome

When The ‘Bread and Circuses’ Are Gone In America

 

 

 

$142.4 Million Dollars For A Painting By Francis Bacon: Art Bubble Or Bold Investment?

Via: Wikipedia

The greater fool theory describes a situation where the price of an object is not being driven by intrinsic values, but by expectations that irrational bidders for limited assets or commodities, will set the price. A price can be justified by a rational buyer under the belief that another party is willing to pay an even higher price. Or one may rationally have the expectation that the item can be resold to a “greater fool” later.

In real estate the greater fool theory can drive investment under the expectation that prices will rise, or force need-based-buyers to out bid irrational or ill-informed buyers. A need-basis can be for basic housing or for organizations fulfilling exigent commercial interests. This phenomenon may also occur among banks offering real estate financing.

In the stock market greater fool theory (also called survivor investing) is the belief held by one who makes a questionable investment, with the assumption that they will be able to sell it later to “a greater fool”; in other words, buying something not because you believe that it is worth the price, but rather because you believe that you will be able to sell it to someone else at an even higher price.

Art is another commodity in which speculation and privileged access drive prices, not intrinsic value. In November 2013, hedge fund manager Steven A. Cohen of SAC Capital is selling artworks at auction which he only recently acquired through private transactions. Works include paintings by Gerhard Richter and Rudolf Stingel and a sculpture by Cy Twombly. They are expected to sell for up to $80 million. In reporting the sale, the New York Times notes that, “Ever the trader, Mr. Cohen is also taking advantage of today’s active art market where new collectors will often pay far more for artworks than they are worth.”

It is similar in concept to the Keynesian beauty contest principle of stock investing.

 

New York Times: Art Is Hard To See Through The Clutter Of Dollar Signs

Herd Behavior

 

Willful Blindness Or Whistleblower? Speak Out And Join The Whistleblowers!

Willful Blindness: Why We Ignore the Obvious at Our Peril by Margaret Heffernan

quotes:

“You cannot fix a problem that you refuse to acknowledge.”

“As long as it (an issue) remains invisible, it is guaranteed to remain insoluble.”

“When we care about people, we care less about money, and when we care about money, we care less about people.”

“The combination of power, optimism and abstract thinking makes powerful people more certain. The more cut-off they are from others, the more confident they are that they are right.”

“Money appears to motivate only our interest in ourselves, making us selfish and self-centered…Money makes people feel self-sufficient, which also means they don’t need or care about others; it’s each man for himself”

“We know – intellectually – that confronting an issue is the only way to resolve it. But any resolution will disrupt the status quo. Given the choice between conflict and change on the one hand, and inertia on the other, the ostrich position can seem very attractive.”

“Dominant people, it appears, use snap judgements and conform to received wisdom more than do the less dominant. Those who need power, and those who have it, think differently.”

“In treating people as less important than things, work becomes both demoralised and demoralising and we become blind to the moral content of our decisions…Money and wilfful blindness make us act in ways incompatible wiht what believe our ethics to be, and often even with our own self-interest…the problem with money isn’t fundamentally about greed, although it can be comforting to think so. The problem with money is that we live in societies in which mutual support and co-operation is essential, but money erodes the relationships we need to lead productive, fulfilling and genuinely happy lives. When money becomes the dominant behavior, it doesn’t cooperate with, or amplify, our relationships; it disengages us from them.”

“Money is just one of the forces that blind us to information and issues which we could pay attention to – but don’t. It exacerbates and often rewards all the other drivers of willful blindness; our preference for the familiar, our love for individuals and for big ideas, a love of busyness and our dislike of conflict and change, the human instinct to obey and conform and our skill at displacing and diffusing responsibility. All of these operate and collaborate with varying intensities at different moments in our lives. The common denominator is that they all make us protect our sense of self-worth, reducing dissonance and conferring a sense of security, however illusory. In some ways, they all act like money; making us feel good at first, with consequences we don’t see. We wouldn’t be so blind if our blindness didn’t deliver rewards; the benefit of comfort and ease.”

“Humans do not have enough mental capacity to do all the things that we think we can do. As attentional load increases, attentional capacity gradually diminishes.”

“When we are tired or preoccupied – what psychologists call ‘resource-depleted’ – we start to economise, to conserve those resources. Higher-order thinking is more expensive. So too is doubt, scepticism, arugment. ‘Resource depletion specifically disables cognitive elaboration,’ wrote Harvard psychologist Daniel Gillbert…Because it takes less brain power to believe than to doubt, we are, when tired or distracted, gullible. Because we are all biased, and biases are quick and effortless, exhaustion tends to make us prefer the information we know and are comfortable with. We are too tired to do the heavier lifting of examining new or contradictory information, so we fall back on our biases the opinions and the people we already trust.”

“The sooner we associate long hours and multitasking with incompetence and carelessness the better. The next time you hear boasts of executives pulling an all-nighter or holding conference calls in their cars, be sure to offer your condolences; it’s grim being stuck in sweatshops run by managers too ignorant to understand productivity and risk. Working people like this is as smart as running your factory without maintenance. In manufacturing and engineering businesses, everyone learns that the top priority is asset integrity: protecting the machinery on which the business depends. In knowledge-based economies, that machinery is the mind.”

Willful Blindness book review

‘Willful blindness’ is a term used in law

Preview: Willful Blindness by Margaret  Heffernan

Controlled Mainstream Media Are ‘Repeaters’ Not Reporters

“Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.”  (Oscar Wilde)

“A newspaper has three things to do. One is to amuse, another is to entertain and the rest is to mislead.” (Ernest Bevin)

“The Washington game is to turn newsmen into repeaters— not reporters,” Johnson said.
(Federal Communication Commission member Nicholas Johnson—ed.)

“The receptivity of the great masses is very limited, their intelligence is small, but their power of forgetting is enormous. In consequence of these facts, all effective propaganda must be limited to a very few points and must harp on these slogans until the last member of the public understands what you want him to understand by your slogan.”
–Adolf Hitler (Mein Kampf Vol. 1 Ch. VI)

“Propaganda is the deliberate, systematic attempt to shape perceptions, manipulate cognitions, and direct behavior to achieve a response that furthers the desired intent of the propagandist.” (Jowett & O’Donnell’s definition)

“The rank and file are more primitive than we imagine. Propaganda must therefore always be essentially simple and repetitious. In the long run only he will achieve basic results in influencing public opinion who is able to reduce problems to the simplest terms and who has the courage to keep forever repeating them in this simplified form despite the objections of intellectuals.” –Joseph Goebbels (from P&A)

“Fictions are necessary to the people, and the Truth becomes deadly to those who are not strong enough to contemplate it in all its brilliance. In fact, what can there be in common between the vile multitude and sublime wisdom? The truth must be kept secret, and the masses need a teaching proportioned to their imperfect reason.” (Albert Pike)

The System Is Controlled By Repeaters

Repeaters in Media

Let’s Call Mainstream Media ‘Repeaters’ Not Reporters 

Propaganda: Team Obama Style 

Fox News – Executive Memos Instruct Employees How To ‘Tilt’ The News 

Government ‘Repeaters’ Create A Climate Of Fear 

Lamestream Media ‘Repeater’ Too Lazy To Do Research

How To Brainwash A Nation

 

 

Charlotte Iserbyt

Charlotte Iserbyt  –  Deliberate Dumbing  Down of the World

Charlotte  Iserbyt – The Miseducation of America

Text of:  The Miseducation of America

Charlotte Iserbyt  Wikipedia 

The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America Website

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