Category Archives: law

Government Calls It ‘Civil Asset Forfeiture’: Americans Call It Robbery

 

“Did you know police can just take your stuff if they suspect it’s involved in a crime? They can!
It’s a shady process called “civil asset forfeiture,” and it would make for a weird episode of Law and Order. See?”    Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

 

 

 

 

 

Via: aclu.org

On May 31, 2008, approximately 130 members of the CAID gathered for Funk Night, a well-publicized monthly event featuring music and dancing from midnight to 5 a.m. Shortly after 2 a.m., Detroit police officers, dressed entirely in black, with their faces masked and guns drawn, stormed into the CAID and ordered everyone present to lie face down. Many of the CAID’s patrons were standing in the back yard and were forced to lie with their faces in the mud.

Those who asked questions, including a lawyer, or did not move fast enough were kicked to the ground by police officers. The officers then separated men and women and searched them all, issuing each a misdemeanor citation for “loitering in a place of illegal occupation.” The officers also seized the cars of anyone who had driven to the CAID under Michigan’s “nuisance abatement” statute. In total, approximately 130 loitering citations were issued and more than 40 vehicles were seized.

Dan Korobkin, ACLU of Michigan staff attorney:

“In a free country, the police may not conduct commando-style raids on innocent people and seize their property without justification,” said Dan Korobkin, ACLU of Michigan staff attorney. “We hope this case will put a stop to the Motor City shakedowns we’ve seen across the city – the practice of arresting innocent people, seizing their cars, and refusing to return them unless they pay a $900 ransom.”

In a 32-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Victoria A. Roberts ruled that the police violated the Fourth Amendment when they arrested everyone at the art gallery merely for being present and seized their cars without evidence that they had broken a law. In addition, Judge Roberts found that the police misconduct at the CAID was not an isolated incident, but was in fact part of “a widespread practice” and “custom” by the Detroit Police Department of unconstitutionally “detaining, searching, and prosecuting large groups of persons” and impounding their cars based on their mere presence at a raid location.

Detroit police raid of the Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit

‘Policing for Profit’ perverts justice

Stopping the abuse of civil asset forfeiture

Why You Should Keep Cash Under Your Mattress

End Civil Asset Forfeiture

Policing for profit

 

 

The Natural Law as a Restraint Against Tyranny: Judge Andrew P. Napolitano

 

“Some men say the earth is flat. 
Some men say the earth is round. 
But if it is flat, could Parliament make it round? 
And if it round, could the kings command flatten it?” – quote from Sir Thomas More’s treason case under Henry VIII

Judge Andrew P. Napolitano:

“Natural Rights can be summarized in four words: the presumption of liberty. This means we are self-directed. We make our own choices.”

 “I do have something to preserve — my dignity and my right to be left alone, the quintessential American right.”

“The right to defend yourself, the right to keep and bear arms does not protect your right to shoot deer. It protects your right to shoot at the government when it is taken over by tyrants”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Know Your Constitution: If You Dont Know Your Rights, You Don’t Have Any Rights!

Your Constitution is an iron clad contract, enforceable in a court of law – Carl Miller

No state may convert a secured liberty into a privilege and issue a license and a fee for it. – Carl Miller

 

Marbury v. Madison : 5 US 137 (1803):
“No provision of the Constitution is designed to be without effect,” “Anything that is in conflict is null and void of law”, “Clearly, for a secondary law to come in conflict with the supreme Law was illogical, for certainly, the supreme Law would prevail over all other laws and certainly our forefathers had intended that the supreme Law would be the basis of all law and for any law to come in conflict would be null and void of law, it would bare no power to enforce, in would bare no obligation to obey, it would purport to settle as if it had never existed, for unconstitutionality would date from the enactment of such a law, not from the date so branded in an open court of law, no courts are bound to uphold it, and no Citizens are bound to obey it. It operates as a near nullity or a fiction of law.”

(If any statement, within any law, which is passed, is unconstitutional, the whole law is unconstitutional.)

History is clear that the first ten amendments to the Constitution were adopted to secure certain common law rights of the people, against invasion by the Federal Government.”– Bell v. Hood, 71 F. Supp., 813, 816 (1947)  U.S.D.C., So. Dist. CA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carl Miller on The Constitution

Constitutional Law by Carl Miller

 

 

 

 

Whistleblower Jamie Balagia Asks Police, Prosecutors and Judges: Since When Did The Constitution Become Negotiable?

 

 

Texas Attorney General candidate Jamie Balagia discusses the current corrupt system in place in police stations.

Jamie Balagia, a trial attorney known as the “DWI Dude.” Balagia is a former Austin police officer known for going head-to-head in court over spurious charges brought by predatory cops and prosecutors. He is lauded for his work in social activism, civil rights, and police accountability.

 

 

 

website: Jamie Balagia ‘The DWI Dude’

 

 

 

 

NWO Police: The Most Likely Encounter You Will Have With Violent Terrorists

As Winston Churchill once said, “Democracy means that when there’s a knock at the door at three in the morning, it’s probably the milkman.” Today, In America, it’s certainly not the milkman, and if it’s a SWAT team at your door, forget the knock.    Jim Fisher

Via: Huffington Post by John W. Whitehead

 

How many children, old people, and law-abiding citizens have to be injured, terrorized or killed before we call a halt to the growing rash of police violence that is wracking the country? How many family pets have to be gunned down in cold blood by marauding SWAT teams before we declare such tactics off limits? And how many communities have to be transformed into military outposts, complete with heavily armed police, military tanks, and “safety” checkpoints before we draw that line in the sand that says “not in our town”?

The latest incident comes out of Atlanta, Georgia, where a SWAT team, attempting to execute a no-knock drug warrant in the middle of the night, launched a flash bang grenade into the targeted home, only to have it land in a crib where a 19-month-old baby lay sleeping. The grenade exploded in the baby’s face, burning his face, lacerating his chest, and leaving him paralyzed. He is currently in the hospital in a medically induced coma.

Where too was the outrage when a Minnesota SWAT team raided the wrong house in the middle of the night, handcuffed the three young children, held the mother on the floor at gunpoint, shot the family dog, and then “forced the handcuffed children to sit next to the carcass of their dead pet and bloody pet for more than an hour” while they searched the home?

Read the full Huffington Post article

 

 

 

 

The Baby-Burning Stormtroopers of Habersham County Georgia

Beaten To Death During  a Traffic Stop

Young Boy Shot To Death By Female Officer

Diabetic Severely Injured During Scuffle With Police

Police Burst Into Wrong Apartment And Shoot Woman Hiding Her Closet

No-Knock SWAT Raid Leaves Texas Father Dead

ebook preview: SWAT Madness and the Militarization of the American Police

 

 

 

Policing For Profit: Institutionalization of Government Looting Results in Police Robbing Citizens

Via: Institute for Justice

Policing for Profit: The Abuse of Civil Asset Forfeiture

by Marion r. Williams, PhD., Jefferson E. Holcomb PhD., Tomislav kovandzic PhD., Scott Bullock

 

Civil forfeiture laws represent one of the most serious assaults on private property rights in the nation today.  Under civil forfeiture, police and prosecutors can seize your car or other property, sell it and use the proceeds to fund agency budgets—all without so much as charging you with a crime.  Unlike criminal forfeiture, where property is taken after its owner has been found guilty in a court of law, with civil forfeiture, owners need not be charged with or convicted of a crime to lose homes, cars, cash or other property.

Americans are supposed to be innocent until proven guilty, but civil forfeiture turns that principle on its head.  With civil forfeiture, your property is guilty until you prove it innocent.

 

 

 

 

Policing for Profit: The Abuse of Civil Asset Forfeiture chronicles how state and federal laws leave innocent property owners vulnerable to forfeiture abuse and encourage law enforcement to take property to boost their budgets.  The report finds that by giving law enforcement a direct financial stake in forfeiture efforts, most state and federal laws encourage policing for profit, not justice.

Policing for Profit
 also grades the states on how well they protect property owners—only three states receive a B or better.  And in most states, public accountability is limited as there is little oversight or reporting about how police and prosecutors use civil forfeiture or spend the proceeds.

Federal laws encourage even more civil forfeiture abuse through a loophole called “equitable sharing” that allows law enforcement to circumvent even the limited protections of state laws.  With equitable sharing, law enforcement agencies can and do profit from forfeitures they wouldn’t be able to under state law.

It’s time to end civil forfeiture.  People shouldn’t lose their property without being convicted of a crime, and law enforcement shouldn’t be able to profit from other people’s property.

 

Looting By U.S. Government at All-Time Highs

Operation Mini-van: NYPD still using scantily clad female officers as bait to forfeit the vehicles of men looking for sex

Cato Institute: Policing For Profit Podcast

Man Loses $160,000 in New Policing For Profit Case

Forbes: Cops In Texas Seize Millions By Policing For Profit

Romulus (MI) Police Chief accused, with fellow officers, of using asset forfeiture funds to pay for drugs, hookers and personal enrichment

Property On Trial: Texas vs. One 2004 Chevy  Silverado

Police ‘Shakedown’: Where Is The Money?  Give Us The Money And You Can Go! 

 

 

 

 

Arrest-Proof Yourself!

Mike Adams talks to Dale Carson, a trial lawyer, former FBI agent, police officer, detective, SWAT team member, undercover operative and private investigator who now defends clients against unfair charges. He is the author of Arrest-Proof Yourself, which is required reading for anyone wanting to avoid unnecessary interactions with the law. 

 

 

 

ebook Preview: Arrest-Proof Yourself

 

 

 

Have Police Stopped You Without Probable Cause?

Via: flexyourrights.org

What Are My Rights At Various Checkpoints?

There are four general types of checkpoints you might encounter: DUI checkpoints, US border checkpoints, drug checkpoints, and TSA checkpoints. In a legal sense, they are not all created equal. So depending on which one you encounter, you’ll want to be prepared to flex your rights appropriately.

DUI Checkpoints

Sobriety checkpoints — also known as DUI checkpoints — are the most common roadblocks you might encounter. They function as a general purpose investigatory tactic where police can get a close look at passing motorists by detaining them briefly. A roadblock stop is quick, but it gives police a chance to check tags and licenses, while also giving officers a quick whiff of the driver’s breath and a chance to peer into the vehicle for a moment.

Remember that your constitutional rights still apply in a roadblock situation. Though police are permitted to stop you briefly, they may not search you or your car unless they have probable cause that you’re under the influence or you agree to the search. As such, you are not required to answer their questions or admit to breaking the law.

 

Read the full Article

 

 

 

 

 

Eddie Craig: Tao Of Law Presentation

Police articles archive

 

 

 

 

What Does The Term ‘Natural’ Mean On Food Labels?

“From a food science perspective, it is difficult to define a food product that is ‘natural’ because the food has probably been processed and is no longer the product of the earth. That said, FDA has not developed a definition for use of the term natural or its derivatives. However, the agency has not objected to the use of the term if the food does not contain added color, artificial flavors, or synthetic substances.”    (Source)

 

 

 

Via:  onlyorganic.org

” If they have to put the word ‘natural’ on a box to convince you, it probably isn’t.  -Eric Schlosser

Food labels that claim a food is “natural” may not guarantee that food is good for you or from nature. In fact, many so-called “natural” foods contain the toxic chemical pesticides, antibiotics, hormones and genetically engineered ingredients that are harming people and the planet. Only the organic seal guarantees that food is being made in ways that Mother Nature intended.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE:  The Pretenders – Nothing ‘Natural’ About Them

Natural’s Best Friend

The ‘Natural’ Deception